Following the murders of Jessica Chapman and Holly Wells by Ian Huntley (a school caretaker) in 2002, the Bichard Inquiry was commissioned. One of the issues this Inquiry looked at was the way employers recruit people to work with children and vulnerable adults. The Inquiry’s recommendations led to the Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006. The Act established the legal basis for the Independent Safeguarding Authority who managed the two lists of people barred from working with children and/or vulnerable adults replacing the former barred lists. The Act also places a statutory duty on all those working with vulnerable groups to register and undergo an advanced vetting process with criminal sanctions for non-compliance. This Act has been amended by the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012. The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 established the DBS (Disclosure and Barring Service) which processes criminal records checks and manages the Barred Children’s and Barred Adults’ Lists of unsuitable people who should not work in regulated activities with these groups. The DBS decides who is unsuitable to work or volunteer with vulnerable groups and it is illegal for a barred person to apply for such work (paid or voluntary), or for a charity to employ a barred person in such work. It is also a legal requirement for employers to refer someone to the DBS if they:
Dismissed them because they harmed a child or adult
Dismissed them because they might have harmed a child or adult otherwise
were planning to dismiss them for either of these reasons, but the person resigned first

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