Daniel Zygmunt Jr
12/4/17
English IV Honors
1.06H Explaining Kipling’s Message
What was Rudyard Kipling’s attitude toward the British Empire, and how did he convey his message in his novella, The Man Who Would Be King? I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
Throughout Rudyard Kipling’s novella, “The Man Who Would Be King”, shows many interpretations of British colonialism being in the region of British controlled India. Through the story he describes the experience of two men which set off from British controlled India to Kafiristan, which these two men had the wish to become kings of said region. Through the whole story, Kipling converses his bleak emotions toward the British Empire, but accounting the positive advantage the Empire can express to an opposing nation, but to sum it all up, Kipling is very displeased with the British Empire. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
Kipling also believed that the upper British class only really cared for themselves and didn’t bother to deal with the necessities of the people who worked for them. He thought they were so appreciative and confident they could run over anybody and do whatever they wanted. He shows this in “The Man Who Would Be King”, when Carnehan decides to say, Therefore, such as it is, we will let it alone, and go away to some other place where a man isn’t crowded and can come to his own. We are not little men, and there is nothing that we are afraid of except Drink, and we have signed a Contrack on that. Therefore, we are going away to be Kings.” This clearly shows they thought maybe we can be better than how they were treated by upper class people in the British Empire and do even bigger things as well. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
The account of Dravot and his friend Peachy is a magnified image of the actions of the British Empire. When Kipling first sees the men at his office, months after their first partnership he says, “I was not please, because I wished to go to sleep, not to squabble with loafers.” Kipling viewed these men as slackers, and had no real right to set out on their “idiotic adventure”. Also the men did come out and say they weren’t very educated, and were undersupplied with concerns on how to efficiently meet their objective. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
At first through the story everything is great and the people of their Empire is doing well, but as the story progresses Dravot and Carnehan start to grow apart from which other and start to argue with each other and eventually one splits away from the Empire to start his own, but this arguing between each other caused the fall of both Empires after the people realized they weren’t Gods. Other than summing up the story, Rudyard Kipling uses word usage and allegorical language to build on his novella. One example being when both characters after a while since their first meeting Kipling found out about Dravot and Carnehan adventure to become Kings and thought of them as “just loafers” and “Was not pleased, because I wished to go to sleep and not squabble with loafers.” He thought their adventure was “Idiotic” and had no real claim to set out on said adventure. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I Based on these information, Kipling had a negative opinion on the British Empire and used word usage and allegorical language to build on his story. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

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